The Best Dungeons and Dragons Board Games

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I’m a huge fan of D&D, and especially love the board games. Table top gaming and board games seem like they should be best friends, and board games are a great way to get people into Dungeons and Dragons themed experiences without having to actually play the game. I rounded up the best Dungeons and Dragons board games for you to choose from.

There have been many Dungeons & Dragons board games over the years, but the latest ones are all really good. Lords of Waterdeep was actually one of the first Euro-style board games I picked up when I started collecting a few years ago. Ever since it’s been one of my favourites.

The Best Dungeons and Dragons Board Games

These are great to play in between your D&D campaigns as a “break”. I also love whipping out a board game when not everyone can make game night and you don’t want them to miss anything.

If you’re looking for Dungeons and Dragons board games with some more weight to it, this is probably the best pick. If you’re not familiar with board games, a “heavy” game usually has complex systems, a higher learning curve, more challenging gameplay, a fairly long play session, and is meant for older teens and adults.

The goal is to recruit and use giants to conquer as much territory as you can. Unlike playing a co-op campaign, this board game is competitive. Euro game players might find some similarities between it and Smallworld, and traditional board game fans can compare this to Risk.

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My kids love playing this beginner introduction to the Dungeons & Dragons world. It says ages 10 and up, but with help younger kids should be fine playing it too. And helping is a must since this game is cooperative!

It’s a bit more heavy on D&D mechanics than other board games. For example, you create your character at the start and choose one of four journeys to play together as a party. Think of it like a super guided D&D campaign with board game elements.

If you want something that you can play with kids or have them play on their own, this game is perfect.

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This is a great D&D inspired game that can be played as a family or with other adults. It’s a card game, which means it’s easy to take along to various venues or keep tossed into your D&D bag for a fun way to get the evening going. It’s great to play when someone is running late for game night, too.

As for the gameplay, rounds last 5-10 minutes. It’s a nice, fast-paced contrast to slower Dungeons and Dragons board games. Everyone chooses a deck (character) and on their turn draws and play cards. The goal is to knock out the other players (everyone has 10 hit points) to win the game.

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I really like the theme of this one, but it’s a bit more D&D than some of the other board games out there. You’re invited for dinner at Castle Ravenloft, but what adventure will unfold when you arrive?

It’s cooperative and there are multiple scenarios, making it a great choice if you’re looking for something that teens can play and get a D&D experience without needing to worry about the complexities (or having a Dungeon Master) that go with traditional Dungeons & Dragons gameplay.

It’s also the only official game on the market right now that you can play solo.

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This is one of the newest games, so the design is a bit more modern than its predecessors. It doesn’t use a board, and set up involves laying out the tiles. They can be flipped as you play so the game keeps evolving as you move through the areas.

The Dungeons & Dragons: Vault Of Dragons Board Game is competitive; you’re racing to see who can get to the vault hidden under Waterdeep first. It’s simply enough to learn, but still complex in that it takes about 60-90 minutes each play through.

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If you read my description at the top then you probably saw this coming, but I’m not alone. Lords of Waterdeep is also the most highly reviewed licensed Dungeons & Dragons board game on Board Game Geek. That’s for good reason: it’s so much fun!

You choose to be one of the Lords of Waterdeep and then compete with other players to collect the most resources. It’s a “worker placement”, which means each round you take turns placing your meeples in different areas to reap the rewards. Of course, there are limits to what you can do (and other players can block you), so you’ll be thinking on the fly.

Meanwhile, you’ll also have quests you’re trying to complete using the resources you gather and secret bonuses to work towards.

It’s medium to heavy in weight, but still easy to understand, plus super thematic!

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More D&D Stuff:

The Best Dungeons and Dragons Board Games – Conclusion

As an experienced board game player, I definitely see the appeal of getting themed board games. You don’t even need to be a Dungeons & Dragons fan to enjoy these games (although it makes them better!). In fact, they’re a great way to get people who aren’t into role playing games interested, too.

They also make great gift ideas for a Dungeons and Dragons fan who has everything else (or you don’t know what they need.)

Written by

Everett

Everett, or Evvy if you're looking at our social media, has been blogging for years. As a parent of 5 in his early 30s, he decided to start The Best Nest to offer practical tips and ideas.